Professor Mary Daly

mary daly

Professor Mary Daly is the first female President of the Royal Irish Academy and is Professor at University College Dublin. 

Mary was educated at University College Dublin (BA, MA) and Nuffield College Oxford (D. Phil.). During her academic career at UCD she also held visiting positions at Harvard Boston College and EUI Florence.

Mary was Principal of UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies for 7 years and has served on the National Archives Advisory Council and the Irish Manuscripts Commission. She has also served on the National Archives Advisory Council and the Irish Manuscripts Commission. From 2000 to 2004 she was Secretary of the Royal Irish Academy and vice-chair of the Academy’s Working Group on Higher Education. Professor Daly was involved in the commemoration of the sesquicentenary of the great famine 1995-97, and with Dr Margaret O’Callaghan she directed a research project on the Golden Jubilee of the 1916 Rising, resulting in the publication of a major edited work: 1916 in 1966: commemorating the Easter Rising (2007). Over the course of her distinguished career, Professor Daly has researched widely and published prolifically, notably: Dublin, the Deposed Capital: A Social and Economic History, 1860-1914 (1984); Women and Work in Ireland (1997); The Slow Failure: Population Decline and Independent Ireland, 1920-1973 (2006); and, with Theo Hoppen, Gladstone: Ireland and Beyond (2011).

Recent Publications:

Mry E. Daly; (2010) The Irish State and the Diaspora. NUI Centennial Lecture. The O’Donnell Lecture 2008. Dublin: National University of Ireland.  

Mary E. Daly; (2010) ‘The ‘women element in politics’:  Irish women and the vote, 1918-2008′ In: Esther Breitenbach and Pat Thane (eds). Women and Citizenship in Britain and Ireland in the Twentieth Century. What Difference Did the Vote Make?. London: Continuum. 

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